January 22 2018

Southeast Region

Map of Southeast Region

2017 Southeast Regional Meeting

Marriott Raleigh Crabtree Valley
Raleigh, HC
March 3–5, 2017

Call for Papers 2017

PLEASE NOTE: Proposals this year are to be submitted through the Google Docs link available here or at the “Proposal Submission Form” tab at the top of the SECSOR home page.

IF you are submitting in any of these sections:

• Ethics, Religion, and Society
• Judaism
• Religion, Culture, and the Arts
• Religions in America
• Religions of Asia
• Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

The chairs of these sections have requested that proposals ALSO be e-mailed to chairs, as indicated in each section’s call. If you are e-mailing your proposal to a chair, please submit it through Google Docs as well.

When you submit a proposal via e-mail, please be sure that the subject line is clear. Suggested format is: SECSOR Proposal / Section Name / Your Name

Although presenters in other sections do not need to send proposals to the section chairs, chairs’ contact information is provided in the Call for Papers as a courtesy for those who may have questions or concerns regarding their proposals.

Paper Prizes and the SBL Regional Scholar Award

Members/participants are reminded that four paper prizes are awarded at every meeting of SECSOR. Prizes are given by SECSOR to the best undergraduate paper submitted; and by each of the three societies (AAR, SBL, ASOR) for the best graduate paper submitted.

All undergraduate papers, which must be received no later than December 15, 2015, are automatically considered for the Undergraduate Paper Prize.

Graduate students who wish to be considered for the AAR or SBL Graduate Student Prize must notify the chair of the section that has accepted their paper, and submit to that chair a paper of no longer than twelve (12) pages no later than January 15, 2016.

Graduate students who wish to be considered for the Joseph A. Callaway award from ASOR must submit to the ASOR chair a paper of no longer than twelve (12) pages by January 15, 2016.

SBL members presenting to one of the SBL sections who have defended their dissertation between March 2012 and March 2016 are encouraged to apply to be considered for the SBL Regional Scholar Award. For more information on the requirements for consideration, please contact Dr. Annie Tinsley: (annietinsley14@gmail.com).

(AAR) Bible and Modern Culture 

The Bible and Modern Culture group invites proposals on any topic related to Bible and contemporary issues of interpretation and hermeneutics. In addition, together with the Constructive Theologies section, we would like to invite papers on “Theological Visions of Hope amidst Modern Dystopias.”

(AAR) Black Cultures and the Study of Religion

The Black Cultures and the Study of Religion Group seeks papers that address “Black Religion and the Politics of Representation.” This call seeks papers that interrogate the various ways that black religion shapes and is shaped by the representational politics that attend to black cultural productions and public discourses involving “blackness.” Historically, the cultural politics that have shaped the representation of blackness have been rooted in a desire for the re-humanization of black bodies in the public imagination. Against racist portrayals of dark-skinned others, black religious agents have participated in resisting such “negative” representations with “positive” ones. Yet, what is the relationship between “religion” and the public representation of “blackness” in this historical moment—especially given recent critiques of “respectability politics” and increased attention to the intersectionality of race, class, gender, sexuality, age, etc., and even articulations of “post-blackness”? Papers might address the relationship between black religion and racial representation in the realms of news, film, music, fashion, television, social media, etc. (historical or contemporary). Keeping in mind, however, the double signification of “representation,” attention to the cultural representation of blackness in the public sphere and policy debates is also very much encouraged. In terms of the latter, papers might consider the ways that competing notions of racial representation have contributed to the perceived rift between religious leaders and contemporary forms of activism, such as Black Lives Matters—i.e., who represents “black interests”—religious leaders, politicians, activists, elders, black youth, etc.? Likewise, papers might consider the ways that certain modes of black religious discourse and practice encourage more complex cultural representations and representational politics than others. 

(AAR) Constructive Theologies

In keeping with the conference theme “Utopia and Dystopia,” the Constructive Theologies Section invites proposals for presentations on the theme of eschatology, broadly construed. Topics for consideration might include the relationship between future-oriented and realized eschatology; visualizations of the Kingdom/Kin-dom of God; eschatology and ecology; eschatology and embodiment; etc. Constructive Theologies also invites proposals for three co-sponsored sessions: (1) “The Reformation, 500 Years Later” with History of Christianity; (2) “Theological Visions of Hope amidst Modern Dystopias” with Bible and Modern Culture; and (3) “Womanist Practical Theology” with Women, Gender and Religion. For the co-sponsored session on Womanist Practical Theology, we especially seek papers that explore how womanist theological approaches interrogate, disrupt, and enrich theological scholarship, pedagogy, or activism. Contact Steven R. Harmon, Gardner-Webb University School of Divinity (sharmon@gardner-webb.edu) and Elizabeth O’Donnell Gandolfo, Wake Forest University School of Divinity (gandoleo@wfu.edu) with any questions.

(AAR) Ethics, Religion, and Society

Proposals on all topics will be considered, but the following topics are encouraged: (1) Ethics, spiritual practice, and wellbeing; (2) Ethics, religion, and climate change; (3) Sexual ethics, especially LGBT aesthetics and ethics; (4) Political ethics with focus on the presidential election. All submissions are encouraged to consider and pay close attention to issues pertaining to the balance between theory and applied ethics. Submit proposals to Sally Holt, Belmont University (sally.holt@belmont.edu) and Michael Stoltzfus, Georgia Gwinnett College (mstoltzfus@ggc.edu). 

(AAR) History of Christianity

We invite proposals that relate the history of Christianity to the theme of the 2017 meeting, “Utopia and Dystopia.” Proposals may deal with any period of history and may be conducted from any methodological or theoretical starting point; the theme “Utopia and Dystopia” may be construed broadly. There will be four sessions. (1) Joint session with Constructive Christian Theologies entitled “The Reformation, 500 Years Later.” (2) Session on “Utopia and Dystopia in the History of Christianity.”(3) Open call. Graduate students are encouraged to send proposals, provided that the proposal includes the name and contact information of a faculty member who agrees to mentor the student as needed. Send questions to Thomas J. Whitley, Florida State University (tjw11c@my.fsu.edu) and Andrew Gardner, Florida State University (abg15@my.fsu.edu).

(AAR) Islam

The theme for this year’s meeting is Utopia and Dystopia; all proposals in Islamic studies on this topic are welcome and the following especially invited: (1) “Critical Review of The Study Qur’an;” we invite discussions on: scholarly critiques and reviews; its contribution to the field and its limitations; questions about the ideology and agendas of its compliers; benefits and limitations of its pluralistic approach; linguistic and terminological analysis; comparison to similar works of translation; and its uses in the classroom and academia. (2) The Teaching and Learning Religion Section in cooperation with the Islam Section seeks papers on the theme of “Teaching Islam Both as Scholars of Islam and Scholars of Other Religious Traditions.” We are looking for papers that address these questions: What are the particular challenges you face as a specialist or a non-specialist in Islam? What unique perspective can you bring to the study of Islam? How do your particular strengths and weaknesses as a specialist or non-specialist shape your teaching practices?

Proposals should be submitted through the web link provided. Questions can be directed to Dr. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu), Dr. Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu), Dr. Eleanor Finnegan (edfinnegan@ua.edu) or Dr. Roshan Iqbal (roshan.iqbal.05@gmail.com) for the combined session, and to Dr. Eleanor Finnegan (edfinnegan@ua.edu) and Dr. Roshan Iqbal (roshan.iqbal.05@gmail.com) for the Islam session.

(AAR) Judaism

Proposals are sought on the following themes: (1) As a joint session between New Testament, Judaism, and ASOR, we invite papers that address issues within these areas that intersect with one another, as reflected in history, texts, archaeology, or historical ethnography in the Second Temple through the Mishnaic periods. Papers focused on utopian and dystopian elements are especially welcome for the joint session. For questions regarding the joint session, contact the New Testament Section chairs: Kathy Barrett Dawson (kathy@kathybarrettdawson.org) or Mark Proctor (mproctor@leeuniversity.edu) the Judaism chairs: Sam Kessler (samuel.j.kessler@gmail.com) or Michael Fuller (mfuller@leeuniversity.edu); or the ASOR chair: Tom McCollough (tom.mccollough@centre.edu). (2) A session on Yaakov Ariel’s An Unusual Relationship: Evangelical Christians and Jews, or on Jewish/Jewish-Christian messianism in the modern period generally. (3) An open call for papers on topics related to Judaism past or present. Submit all paper proposals by email to Michael Fuller, Lee University (mfuller@leeuniversity.edu) and Samuel Kessler (samuel.j.kessler@gmail.com).

(AAR) Method and Theory in the Study of Religion

The Method and Theory in Religion Section seeks papers related to the following topics: (1) Method and Theories related to Dystopias and Utopias. What causes people to believe in utopian/dystopian visions? How do people construct visions of the future and to what purpose? Papers should engage a particular theoretical apparatus (psychological, sociological, biological, literary, etc.) in their analysis. (2) The 2016 Election and Religion: An Analysis. How important was religion in the election of 2016? We seek papers that address an analysis of the different candidates’ use or avoidance of religion and what role religion or religious themes played in the election and the electorate. (3) Analyzing Contemporary Evangelicalism. Evangelicalism has been portrayed as on the ropes. Membership is declining, the Donald Trump phenomena seemed to belie the unity of the movement, and millennials are increasingly abandoning Evangelicalism. We seek papers that analyze what is happening in Evangelicalism from a theoretical standpoint. Why and to what degree is Evangelicalism in trouble? What sort of reconfigurations or alternatives will result?

(AAR) Philosophy of Religion

Themes: Proposals on all topics in Philosophy of Religion will be considered, but the following session themes are encouraged: (1) A session on the conference theme of “Utopia/Dystopia;” (2) An open call for presentations in any area of philosophy of religion; (3) A possible joint session with Method and Theory on Kevin Schilbrack’s Philosophy and the Study of Religion: A Manifesto, consisting of an author-meets-respondents conversation.* For all sessions, please direct questions to Nathan Eric Dickman, Young Harris College (nedickman@yhc.edu) or Stephen Dawson, Lynchburg College (dawson.s@lynchburg.edu). *For the joint session on Schilbrack’s book, questions may also go to Laura Ammon (AmmonLL@appstate.edu) or Randall W. Reed (reedrw@appstate.edu).

(AAR) Religion and Ecology

Themes: All proposals that deal with the interface of religion and ecology/nature will considered but those addressing the 2017 theme of “Dystopia/Utopia” are encouraged: (1) explorations of Utopian and Dystopian themes in ecological discourse, aesthetics and practice; (2)  as our meeting location, Raleigh, NC, is located at the heart of the Food and Faith movement, we invite papers on the subject of Eating and the Intersections of Faith, Nature, Work and Community; (3) Ecological Martyrs (in honor of Berta Caceres, assassinated in Honduras in 2016); (4) Thinking about the End: Religion and Extinction. Send questions to Jefferson Calico, University of the Cumberlands (mailto:jefferson.calico@ucumberlands.edu).

(AAR) Religion, Culture, and the Arts

Themes: All papers related to Religion, Culture, and the Arts will be considered. Special consideration will be given to papers or panels related to the following themes: (1) Papers dealing with the meeting’s 2017 theme “Utopia and Dystopia” in science fiction books, films, and other media; (2) Religion and Young Adult and/or Children’s Literature; (3) Religion and Games/Gaming; (4) Open call. Please submit proposals to co-chair Meredith Ross (mr09@my.fsu.edu). (5) Co-sponsored with the Religions in America section, we issue a joint call for papers for an “author meets critic” roundtable on Dr. Jason Bivins’s Spirits Rejoice! Jazz and American Religion (Oxford, 2015). Proposals to this joint session should be submitted with copies to both Sections. Email proposals to this joint session to Meredith Ross (mr09@my.fsu.edu) with copy to Dr. Monica Reed (mcreed@lsu.edu) and Andy McKee (am13ag@my.fsu.edu).

(AAR) Religions in America

Themes: Papers in all areas of Religions in America will be considered, but special consideration will be given to the following themes: (1) Religion, Immigration, and Borders; (2) Religion in Politics; (3) Papers dealing specifically with the meeting’s 2017 theme “Utopia and Dystopia” in the Americas; and (4) Open Session: papers are invited on topics related to religion in an American context. Email proposals to the Religions in America Section to Dr. Monica Reed (monicaCreed@gmail.com) and Andy McKee (am13ag@my.fsu.edu). (5) Co-sponsored with the Religion, Culture, and the Arts section, we issue a joint call for papers for an “author meets critic” roundtable on Dr. Jason Bivins’s Spirits Rejoice! Jazz and American Religion (Oxford, 2015). Proposals to this joint session should be submitted with copies to both sections. Email proposals to this joint session to Dr. Monica Reed (monicaCreed@gmail.com) and Andy McKee (am13ag@my.fsu.edu) with copy to Meredith Ross (mr09@my.fsu.edu).

(AAR) Religions of Asia

Themes: (1) In conjunction with the 2017 theme “Utopia/Dystopia” we solicit proposals on the topic of utopia and dystopia in Asian religious texts, traditions, practices, rituals, and religious communities. (2) A joint session with Women, Gender and Religion Section on women and gender in Asian religions.* (3) Open call – we encourage proposals from any subject within Religions of Asia. For all sessions, please send proposals to Lisa Battaglia, Samford University (lbattagl@samford.edu) and Rachel Pang, Davidson College (rhpang@davidson.edu). *For questions regarding the joint session with Women, Gender and Religion, please contact Laine Walters Young (laine.c.walters.young@vanderbilt.edu), Vicki Phillips (phillips_v@wvwc.edu) or Zannah Kimbrel (skimbrel@uncc.edu).

(AAR) Secularism, Religious Freedom, and Global Politics

Proposals from any disciplinary or methodological perspective on topics related to secularism, religious freedom, and global politics are welcome. We are especially interested in proposals related to (1) The roles of religious freedom in international relations and foreign policy; (2) Critical accounts of “freedom” or “religious” in the production of “religious freedom;” (3) Conceptualizations and consequences of the public and private; (4) Discourses of religious freedom in historical or contemporary debates about refugees.

(AAR) Teaching and Learning Religion

The Teaching and Learning Religion section critically examines pedagogical theory and practice. For the 2017 meeting, we invite paper proposals related to the following three themes: 1) For a session on “Teaching Struggling Students,” we invite papers that address the question: “What are the best practices for helping and empowering students who have a difficult time adjusting to higher education for social, cultural, economic, religious, academic, or other reasons?” Proposals should be submitted through the web link provided. If you have questions please contact Dr. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu) or Dr. Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu). Chair: Dr. Derrick Lemons. 2) For a joint session with the Islam section, we seek paper proposals on the theme of “Teaching Islam both as Scholars of Islam and Scholars of Other Religious Traditions.” In this session, paper should explore the following questions: What are the particular challenges you face as a specialist or a non-specialist in Islam? What unique perspective can you bring to the study of Islam? How do your particular strengths and weaknesses as a specialist or non-specialist shape your teaching practices? Proposals should be submitted through the web link provided. Questions can be directed to Dr. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu), Dr. Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu), Dr. Eleanor Finnegan (edfinnegan@ua.edu), or Dr. Roshan Iqbal (roshan.iqbal.05@gmail.com). 3) For a third session, we offer an open call for papers. The Teaching and Learning Religion section invites proposals that join innovative teaching practice with the scholarship of teaching and learning. Demonstrations of new or original teaching strategies are welcomed as a part of presentations. Proposals should be submitted through the provided web link. Please direct questions to either Dr. Jodie Lyon (lyon@uga.edu) or Dr. Derrick Lemons (dlemons@uga.edu). Chair: Dr. Jodie Lyon.

(AAR) Women, Gender, and Religion

Women, Gender and Religion seeks proposals for a session that constructively engage with relationality: new takes on intimate relationships, relational forms (particularly new, or evolving ones like polyamory, same-sex marriage, cohabitation as mainstream, self-love, etc.), law and religion’s joint influence on relationships, ecclesiastical relationality; and relationships in ministry. For questions, contact the co-chairs, Vicki Phillips (phillips_v@wvwc.edu) and Laine C. Walters-Young (laine.c.walters.young@vanderbilt.edu).

Joint session: The Women, Gender, and Religion group, in collaboration with the Constructive Theologies group, welcomes papers on the broad theme of womanist practical theology. We especially seek papers that explore how womanist theological approaches interrogate, disrupt, and enrich theological scholarship, pedagogy, or activism. Direct questions for this joint session to WGR co-chairs Vicki Phillips, phillips_v@wvwc.edu, and Laine C. Walters-Young, laine.c.walters.young@vanderbilt.edu, or to the co-chairs for the Constructive Theologies group, Elizabeth Gandolfo (gandolfo@wfu.edu) and  Steve Harmon (sharmon@gardner-webb.edu).

Joint Session: Women, Gender, and Religion and Asian Religions invite proposals on women and gender in Asian religions. Direct questions for this joint session to WGR co-chairs Vicki Phillips, phillips_v@wvwc.edu, and Laine C. Walters-Young, laine.c.walters.young@vanderbilt.edu, or to the co-chairs for Asian Religions, Rachel H. Pang, rhpang@davidson.edu, and Lisa J. Battaglia, lbattagl@samford.edu.

(ASOR) Archaeology and the Ancient World     

1) Open session – We encourage submissions that report on ongoing excavations, on archaeological theory and/or method, and other topics relating to material culture and archaeology.

2) Joint Session with SBL/New Testament and AAR/Judaism on utopia and dystopia in literature and material culture. As a joint session with New Testament, Judaism, and ASOR, we invite papers that address issues within these areas that intersect with one another, as reflected in history, texts, archaeology, or historical ethnography in the Second Temple through the Mishnaic periods. Papers focused on utopian and dystopian elements are especially welcome for the joint session. For questions regarding the joint session, contact the New Testament Section chairs: Kathy Barrett Dawson (kathy@kathybarrettdawson.org) or Mark Proctor (mproctor@leeuniversity.edu); the Judaism chairs: Sam Kessler (samuel.j.kessler@gmail.com) or Michael Fuller (mfuller@leeuniversity.edu); or the ASOR chair: Tom McCollough (tom.mccollough@centre.edu).

3) Teaching in the Field: Best Practices in Field Schools – We are interested in papers from those who both lead and have been participants in archaeological field schools.

(SECSOR) Undergraduate Research

Students at institutions in the Southeast Region are invited to submit papers for the Undergraduate Sessions, sponsored by SECSOR. Open to all topics, the sessions will be composed of the papers considered the best submissions by an interdisciplinary committee. Students should submit completed papers that reflect original student research of an appropriate length for presentation (approximately 12 double-spaced pages). No paper over 15 double-spaced pages, regular size font, will be considered; one submission per student. On a cover page, please include contact information for the student and a faculty sponsor who has reviewed the submission. Proposals are to be submitted through the Google Docs link no later than December 15, 2016. The link is available at the “Proposal Submission Form” tab at the top of the SECSOR home page. Questions may be directed to the program chairs: for AAR, Dr. Diana Walsh Pasulka (pasulkad@uncw.edu); for SBL, Dr. Doug Hume (doug.hume@pfeiffer.edu). Note: Undergraduates may submit proposals to other sections as well.

All undergraduate papers are automatically considered for the Undergraduate Paper Prize.

(SBL) Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

The Old Testament/Hebrew Bible section invites proposals for two open sessions (one on Friday evening, and one on Saturday morning), particularly regarding this year’s theme. In addition, we request proposals related to the reception history of biblical texts to be presented at the third session (on Saturday afternoon). Send your submissions to the section co-chairs, Jim West (jwest@highland.net) and David Schreiner (dbschreiner@gmail.com).

We would also be grateful to anyone who would like to volunteer to chair a session. Email the co-chairs if you are interested in doing so.

(SBL) New Testament    

The New Testament section for the 2017 SECSOR conference invites paper proposals for the following sessions: (1) Papers engaging narrative strategies in the New Testament writings; (2) Papers that deal with reactions to persecution as demonstrated in the texts of the New Testament; (3) An open call for papers in any area of New Testament studies; and (4) A joint session between New Testament, Judaism, and ASOR inviting papers that address issues within these areas that intersect with one another, as reflected in history, texts, archaeology, or historical ethnography in the Second Temple and Mishnaic periods. In keeping with the conference theme, Utopia and Dystopia, papers focused on utopian and dystopian elements are especially welcome for the joint session. For questions regarding the New Testament sessions, contact the New Testament Section chairs: Kathy Barrett Dawson (kathy@kathybarrettdawson.org) or Mark Proctor (mproctor@leeuniversity.edu). For questions regarding the joint session, contact the New Testament Section chairs; the Judaism chairs: Sam Kessler (samuel.j.kessler@gmail.com) or Michael Fuller (mfuller@leeuniversity.edu); or the ASOR Chair: Tom McCollough (tom.mccollough@centre.edu).