July 15 2018

 

photo of a river confluence

Barrett, Betty J. "Is ‘Safety’ Dangerous? A Critical Examination of the Classroom as Safe Space." The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 1, no. 1 (2010): article 9. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5206/cjsotl-rcacea.2010.1.9.

Chakrabarty, Dipesh. Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000.

Conde-Frazier, Elizabeth, S. Steve Kang, and Gary A. Parrett. A Many Colored Kingdom: Multicultural Dynamics for Spiritual Formation. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2004.

Esterline, David, Namsoon Kang, Joshva Raja, and Dietrich Werner, eds. Handbook of Theological Education in World Christianity. Eugene, OR: Regnum Books, 2010.

Fernandez, Eleazar S. Burning Center, Porous Borders: The Church in a Globalized World. Eugebe, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2011.

Emily Bailey, University of Pittsburgh

I have to admit that despite how ridiculously excited I am to be nearing the final stages of the graduate school process—to get into the classroom and put some of this knowledge to practical use—I’m a bit afraid of the students who will be sitting on the other side of the desk. We’ve all experienced it in some capacity; a room full of eyes staring at us, brimming with expectations, and if we’re lucky, even interest. However, as I observe the next generation of students I can’t help but be aware of a new set of expectations they have for their faculty—the kind of expectations that leave me wondering if we, as future instructors, are fully prepared.

by Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore, Vanderbilt University

Almost twenty years ago, when considering pregnancy a subversive state bearing “generative lessons unknown to men and angels,” I made the following remark: “Serious involvement in child bearing and rearing involves an . . . unrelenting tug of attachment, what Kristeva calls a pain that ‘comes from the inside’ and ‘never remains apart. . . . You may close your eyes, . . . teach courses, run errands, . . . think about objects, subjects.’ But a mother is marked by a tenacious link to another that . . . never quite goes away .” (Miller-McLemore, Also a Mother, 143. See also Julia Kristeva, "Stabat Mater," in The Kristeva Reader, ed. Toril Moi, Columbia University Press, 1986: 166)

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