April 22 2018

by Mary E. Hunt, WATER

Privilege is a major factor in life/work balance. Sure, all of us can learn how to say no, put exercise first, eat healthily, get plenty of rest, and set up date nights. But race, class, sexual orientation/identity, age, ethnicity, etc., play pivotal roles in our options and whether we can exercise them.

I do not mean to imply that only privileged women can live balanced lives. Many do not. But colleagues who are loaded with debt, supporting parents as well as children, dealing with complex commuting arrangements, facing health challenges, and the like simply do not have the same luxury to decide whether they will start their day at the health club or end it with a massage. Achieving life-work balance becomes one more item on an already too long to-do list. For many colleagues survival is the goal.

Zip bag filled with yellow pins that read "hire humanities"

Ask Academic Abby about what's bugging you right now. Several women in the profession have volunteered to answer your questions about professional concerns. Contact them!

Early this month, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced the awarding of $79 million in grants for over 300 humanities projects, many of which support religious studies research.

A total of over $2 million dollars in grants was awarded to projects focusing on religious studies. Many of the grantees are active members of the AAR. We extend warm congratulations to our following members:

David Albertson (University of Southern California)

Project Title: The Tegernsee Debate on Love and Reason: Mystical Letters and Treatises in Late Medieval Germany

Project Description: Preparation of a one-volume English translation of fifteenth-century Latin documents written at Tegernsee Monastery, Germany, debating the value of Christian piety and reason in identifying common ground with Judaism and Islam.

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